Side Dish: Shana Tova

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Why is it when September rolls around we all feel inclined for a fresh start? Any new years resolutions are usually out of the window by the 1st February, and then we like to immerse our heads in a large Gin and Tonic for the rest of the year and pretend like we never made any resolutions in the first place… just us? Didn’t think so. From a young age it is embedded into our psyche that September is a month of new beginnings; whether it be reluctantly returning to school, or even as you grow up September can mean the end of summer romances or just back to work after a couple of weeks in the sun. It often leads to us looking at our lives in a completely new light – like a new-year resolution but 9 months late.

Luckily for us, Jewish New Year falls in September. Rosh Hashanah (celebrated this year between the 20th-22nd of September) is a time for rejoicing new beginnings and embracing a clean slate. You’ve guessed correctly; this weeks post isn’t a recipe, or tips from our hosting calibre. Instead this week we embrace Rosh Hashanah and look towards setting some new goals for the next year ahead.

Over at Ginseng and Thyme we have achieved so much in the last 9 months; a blossoming friendship, an array of delicious recipes, a website and blog we can be proud of, and a Northern Blog Award no less… But what can we take from this Jewish festival of new tidings to take forward on our travels as we approach 2018?

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Rabbi Brad Hirschfield’s words are beautiful and ring true. Why should any festival be avoided simply because it has religion at it’s core? Don’t get us wrong, we’re a couple of girls raised in Jewish and Catholic homes, who have somewhat deviated from their religious-roots, but festivals seem to be avoided like the plague in the 21st Century. Who died and made God uncool? Any festival that embraces good will towards man is a-okay in our book, and we think the world needs a little joyfulness right now.

Want to embrace your inner Israelite and celebrate the festival with friends this weekend? It’s traditional to dip apples in honey to symbolise the hope for a sweet year ahead. According to Cohen (whoever he was…) the reason honey is used is its association with the manna from heaven – described in the Torah as being “like honey wafers” – provided by God during the 40 years that the Jewish people wandered the desert. It was supposed to remind Jews that any sustenance or material benefits that came their way were “solely dependent upon God’s grace and favour…” Heavy.

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You know us; any excuse to jump onto a good thing, and if honey is involved us Manchester bees are on it. Here’s a few of our Rosh Hashanah resolutions, incase you were wondering, we haven’t quite ordered the commiseration Gin and Tonics just yet…

G’s resolution: Remember that what you see in the mirror and the way other people see you are two very different things. Maybe try looking at yourself from an outsiders prospective from time to time.

T’s Resolution: Have a little faith in yourself, what you do and who you are. Don’t listen to that anxious incubus on your shoulder, he knows jack shit about food and only holds you back.

G&T’s Resolution: To take positive steps towards strengthening Ginseng & Thyme’s portfolio; world domination, one post at a time.

Shana Tova!
& see you next Thursday,
G&T

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Hello! We are Ginseng & Thyme, two friends and work colleagues from Manchester with a passionate affinity for food, drink and lifestyle. Here’s our food story, what’s yours? Twitter: @ginsengandthyme Instagram: @ginsengandthyme

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